From Belarus to Black Lives Matter

Rethinking protests in Belarus through a transnational feminist perspective

Authors

  • Tatsiana Shchurko Ohio State University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17356/ieejsp.v8i4.1007
Abstract Views: 238 PDF Downloads: 117

Keywords:

Black Lives Matter, Belarus, transnational feminist solidarity, exile, racial logics

Abstract

This article examines the lack of solidarity between the Black Lives Matter protests in the U.S. and the anti-authoritarian uprising in Belarus in 2020. Specifically, I explore how distant geographies and feminist communities can relate to each other and thus challenge the rise of right-wing conservatism, white supremacy, and neoliberal authoritarianism. This article relies on auto-ethnography and the exploration of public media, political essays, and scholarly contributions discussing the meanings of the BLM and Belarusian protests. Through critical self-reflection and by deploying the concepts of ‘exile’ and ‘transnational feminist solidarity,’ this article suggests a possibility for alternative transnational feminist connections attentive to the complexities of global power relations and uneven east/west interconnections. Rethinking the current possibilities for solidarities may lead to seeing how the uprising in Belarus and the BLM protests have points of connection on the grounds of state-sanctioned violence, neoliberal enclosures, suppression of political dissent, and their racialized/colonial roots. However, forging transnational solidarities also requires a certain work of reflection on how political protests may uphold global racial/colonial logic and overshadow racial violence. Therefore, in this article, I foreground how post-Soviet vulnerability may help disrupt the status quo or the privilege of whiteness instead of reinforcing it.

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Published

2023-01-18

How to Cite

[1]
Shchurko, T. 2023. From Belarus to Black Lives Matter: Rethinking protests in Belarus through a transnational feminist perspective. Intersections. East European Journal of Society and Politics. 8, 4 (Jan. 2023), 25–41. DOI:https://doi.org/10.17356/ieejsp.v8i4.1007.

Issue

Section

Gender Studies in Exile